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NOVELS BOOKS ANALYSIS

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NOVELS BOOKS ANALYSIS

NOVELS BOOKS ANALYSIS

NOVELS BOOKS ANALYSIS :- Literature written in the English language includes many countries such as the United Kingdom and its crown dependencies, Republic of Ireland, the United States, and the countries of the former British Empire.

How do you analyze a novel?

Reading literature (novels and plays, for example) requires a different approach than reading a textbook. In literature, the meaning isn’t often stated directly, but is implied. You have to get a sense on your own of what the work means, instead of having the author explicitly saying, “This is idea 1, and this is idea 2.”

Good writers do create stories that are organized and comprehensible. For example, a story usually follows some organization, whether it’s told chronologically, in flashbacks, from different perspectives, and so on. Also, writers provide many clues to the meaning or main ideas they want you to get from the work.

In particular, the following points are important to consider when reading and analyzing literature:

Characters: Who are the main characters in the piece? What are the names and roles of the main characters? Who is the narrator, the person telling the story? Does this person have a bias? That is, can you trust what he or she is saying?

Events and interaction: What happens in the story? How do the characters interact? How are they related or connected? Why do the characters act or behave the way they do? Why do the events play out as they do?

Setting: Where does the piece take place? Is the setting critical to the story? Does the setting provide background? Does the setting give historical, physical, or other information that is key to the story?

Time: When does the story take place? Is it timeless, or is it grounded in a particular place and time?

Organization: How is the story organized? Most commonly, stories are told chronologically, but in some works, you may find that the author moves back and forth (in time as well as place).

Writing style: What does the writing style tell you about the story? Is the writing richly detailed? Is it sparse? (For example, Hemingway was famous for his Spartan writing style.) How does the writing style affect the meaning? Do you have to make assumptions or guesses because there are gaps?

Symbolism: Symbolism can be tricky because, sometimes, as the saying goes: “A cigar is just a cigar.” Other time, a journey represents something beyond the trip itself. For example, Huck Finn’s trip was more about his development as a person than his trip down the river.

Theme: What are the themes of the story? What elements or ideas are repeated or emphasized? Think about this throughout your reading, not just at the end. Notice what people, places, and events pop up over and over again.

Retelling of a story: Many stories are in some way or form a retelling of a previous story. If you think about Huckleberry Finn’s trip, you can find other trips from Greek mythology (Homer’s Odyssey) to the Bible (the trip of the Magi) with similarities.

ENGLISH GENARAL ANALYSIS 

INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

FUNCTIONS OF LITERATURE

ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE

ORAL LITERATURE

WRITTEN LITERATURE

NOVELS BOOKS ANALYSIS ORDINARY LEVEL

UNANSWERED CRIES

WEEP NOT, CHILD

PASSED LIKE A SHADOW

THE INTERVIEW

A WREATH FOR FATHER MAYER | NOVEL

LEARN ALSO

HOW TO ANSWER QUESTIONS ON NOVELS

ADVANCED LEVEL NOVELS

A MAN OF THE PEOPLE by Chinua Achebe

LITERATURE IN ENGLISH NOVELS

HOUSE BOY BY FERDINAND OYONO

THE OLD MAN AND THE MEDAL BY FERDINAND OYONO

THE CONCUBINE BY ELECHI AMADI

GIRLS AT WAR BY CHINUA ACHEBE

A WALK IN THE NIGHT BY ALEX LA GUMA

DEVIL ON THE CROSS

How To Analyze A Book Addition Tips

Learning how to analyze a book will change the way you read and write. It’s easy to do and time well spent. We explain how.

Many new writers don’t appreciate how much they could accelerate their skills by reading more critically. That means analyzing a book once you’re done.

1. Pick A Book To Analyze

2. Read The Book Twice

3. Annotate Key Sections

4. Establish The Book’s Key Idea

5. Review The Context Behind The Book

6. Chart The Book’s Story Arcs

7. Reflect On Your Emotional Reaction

8. Evaluate The Book’s Bigger Picture

9. Mind Map The Book

10. Take Apart A Single Chapter

11. Check Other Blurbs, Reviews And Book Summaries

12. Add Entries To Your Slipbox

13. Review Your Book Analysis Regularly

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